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BTBT Unlimited Infinity 1 + Calls
52Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£29.99p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £369.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Up to 17Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
17Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£19.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Broadband + Calls
17Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£23.99p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £307.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Freeview + BT Sport (add at checkout)
  • Up to 17Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
17Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£69.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Broadband + Calls + TV Starter & Sport
17Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£27.49p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £399.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Freeview + BT Sport
  • Up to 52Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
52Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£59.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Infinity + Calls + TV Starter & Sport
52Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£33.49p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £461.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Up to 76Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£9.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Infinity 2 + Calls
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£39.99p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £489.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Freeview + 29 premium channels
  • Up to 52Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
52Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£29.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Infinity + Calls + TV Entertainment
52Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£39.99p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £509.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Freeview + BT Sport
  • Up to 76Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£59.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Infinity 2 + Calls + TV Starter & Sport
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£43.49p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £581.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Freeview + 29 premium channels
  • Up to 76Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£29.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Infinity 2 + Calls + TV Entertainment
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£49.99p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £629.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Freeview + 60 premium channels
  • Up to 52Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
52Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£19.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Infinity + Calls + TV Max
52Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£51.99p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £643.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
BT
  • Freeview + 60 premium channels
  • Up to 76Mb download speed
  • Truly unlimited monthly usage
  • Free weekend calls
  • 18 month contract
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£19.99
set-up
cost
BTBT Unlimited Infinity 2 + Calls + TV Max
76Mb
speed
(up to)
Unlimited
monthly usage
(truly unlimited)
£61.99p/m
includes line rental1st year cost: £763.87
  • Offer ends 1st March
See Deal
10

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About BT broadband

A bit of history about BT

BT broadband

BT, then known as British Telecom was founded in 1969, but its origins date back even further, evolving as it did from the Electric Telegraph company, which formed in 1846, which – we assume – evolved from the Shouting Loudly From A Hilltop Company first formed several thousand years earlier.

In all seriousness, though, BT’s been around a long time. For much of it it was the UK’s only telecoms provider, until 1984 when it was privatised and became British Telecommunications plc. Shifting forward a couple of decades, BT was forced by Ofcom, the UK telecoms regulator, to create Openreach, a nominally separate entity which would oversee the (at the time) copper phone network. Openreach’s remit was to manage the retail and wholesale of lines to other providers and create fair competition in the marketplace – which explains why you have more providers to choose from in 2018 than, you know, just BT.

BT broadband in the modern era

These days, BT offers two types of broadband: ADSL and fibre. The former it just calls ‘BT broadband’, while the latter it likes to refer to as ‘BT Infinity’. The difference between the two technologies is that ADSL runs entirely on copper-core cabling, where fibre runs partly on fibre-optic (glass-core) cabling.

BT broadband has been getting gradually faster since 2007, its maximum speed now standing at a not-all-that-impressive 17Mbps. That’s fine for small households and people who don’t do a lot of downloading or heavy-duty streaming to multiple screens throughout the house.

BT Infinity began life in 2009, rolled out to just 50 homes in Foxhall, Ipswich. The service stared out as a part-fibre network, and continues to be exactly that to this day. Part-fibre networks are referred to as ‘FTTC’ in the biz – or Fibre To The Cabinet. Pretty apt name since it literally means the cables are fast fibre (glass core) only as far as the cabinet on the street, while remaining copper the rest of the way to your house. This last bit is commonly referred to as the ‘last mile’. Even if it’s not a mile.

And you’d better hope it isn’t an actual mile. The problem with the copper cables found both in BT Broadband and BT Infinity networks is that after about 800m from the cabinet they’re no longer able to carry many of the frequencies needed for fast broadband. The upshot of that is the further from the cabinet you live, the slower your broadband, and that applies as much to BT Infinity as it does to BT broadband.

In all honesty, it shouldn’t really be this way. When BT first began rolling out fibre broadband it promised to ensure that at least 25% of those connections were ‘FTTP’ or Fibre To The Premises. Pretty self explanatory: Basically, glass-core fibre all the way to your house. This type of network doesn’t suffer slow-down over distance, and is capable of – truly – insane speeds.

BT reneged on that promise and is only now beginning to roll out FTTC to a small number of locations later on in 2018. It’s also preparing to roll out a technology it’s calling ‘G-fast’ – a way of getting faster speeds over the existing copper. G-fast does not, however, make things any quicker from folk living far from the cabinet.

BT broadband is pretty good

If all that sounds terrifically negative, it’s not meant to be. It’s just good to have an idea of where BT’s current range of broadband products is, why it’s slower than Virgin Media (which is not on Openreach and uses a different technology), and why its entry-level Infinity fibre is faster (at 52Mbps) than any other UK provider (who all offer 38Mbps).

There can be no doubt that BT is what we like to term as a ‘premium provider’, in so much as it differentiates itself from ‘budget providers’. Budget providers have their place – they cost very little and cater to those who just want internet of some kind, any kind, in their house. But they also tend to come with very few frills – something most obvious in the often-cheap, plasticky form of the supplied router.

You’ll get none of that tat from BT. And though BT does tend to sit towards the more expensive end of the market it is also the undisputed king of cashback, free gifts and other offers. At certain times of the year you can literally save hundreds off you annual broadband cost in the form of cashback, gifts and sale prices.

A secret about BT broadband and Infinity

Here’s something almost no one knows about BT as a broadband provider: BT will literally buy you out of your existing contract. Broadband contracts are usually 12-18 months in length and all providers impose penalties for leaving early. Some providers – BT being one of them – will offset the cost of leaving your old provider and switching to BT by up to £300. Wow, what?

But wait. That’s not quite as good as it sounds. You’ll still have to pay your exit fees, but BT will knock a little off your monthly bill up to the value of your buyout or the aforementioned £300. Still, it’s pretty generous, don’t you think?

BT home phone calling packages

If you’ve read what we’ve said above about how BT delivers broadband to your home, you’ll understand why it’s impossible to have broadband without a phone line. The phone line is the broadband. The broadband is the phone line. The worm is the spice. The spice is the worm.

As such, BT offers a range of calling packages to go along with it. They are: Unlimited Weekend Calls, Unlimited Evening And Weekend Calls, and Unlimited Anytime Calls. And no we’re not going to explain what each of those are and what they offer as their names do that all by themselves.

BT also does TV

Without going into too much detail here, BT also offers its own TV in a similar vein to to Sky or Virgin Media. It’s not quite as good as either of those going on channel count alone. However, BT’s set-top boxes are competent enough, while BT Sport offers a lot of content you won’t see anywhere else, including Champions League and Premier League football.

What you need to know

  • Prices last checked and verified 23rd February 2018
  • Broadband speeds may vary
  • Monthly costs include line rental
  • All prices are inclusive of VAT except business packages
  • You should have the right to cancel without penalty if your provider increases charges during the minimum term of your contract
  • Some providers offer line rental reduced prices when an upfront payment is made for 12 months
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